Happy Prue Day!

A very Happy Birthday for the wonderful Prudence Bury-Fuchs! This is a promotional photo with Prue and Terry, her first husband, after they were married and had moved to New York in 1965.

Prue and Terry Hooper,  New York, 1965

Prue and Terry Hooper, New York, 1965

They were promoting the Youthquake fashion campaign, about which I’ll have more later.

Prue Terry 1965 Notice

There is a new Blu-ray release coming from Criterion of A Hard Day’s Night. I’m very pleased to see that Criterion includes Prue in the cast list.

Pathe-tic!

British Pathé has put 85,000 videos on YouTube, including this one, for all of you youngsters to watch if don’t understand what all the excitement was about with the Beatles.

Biased for neutrality

Now that Reed Hastings, CEO of Netflix, is agreeing to pay cable TV providers what I consider to be, in essence, protection money, he’s feeling free to criticize the deals. And he should, because the problem has nothing to do with Netflix using up a lot of ISP bandwidth. It’s the inherent conflict of interest that cable providers have by also being Internet service providers.

Cable TV companies collect the money for HBO subscriptions but they don’t collect the money for Netflix subscriptions. That’s what is driving them crazy. Their extremely profitable business model is falling apart and they’re desperate to force Internet video to be part of the old model. They want to sell the Netflix channel to their customers the same way they sell premium cable TV channels. Well, that just shouldn’t happen, because if the argument is that Netflix is using their bandwidth then they will have to charge every Internet service an additional fee for using the bandwidth, whether or not they compete with their cable TV business — bandwidth that their customers are already paying for.

Separating Truth from Fiction

The 2012 Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film went to “A Separation,” and rightly so. This Iranian movie about the collision of the lives of two families, and within the families, is outstanding. We watched it on a Netflix Blu-ray rental, but for now it’s available on YouTube. The drama is compelling and universal, but in the second half it’s obvious that the Iranian legal system is not at all like America’s.